University study on online dating

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“We don’t always fall in love with our clone so a wider dating net, be it outside of race and ethnicity or tapping into a large LGBTQ pool creates happy unions,” she said.

Those unions could also lead to a more harmonious society, the study from Ortega and Hergovich found.

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By 2007-2009, 22 percent of heterosexual couples and 61 percent of same-sex couples had found their partners through the Web.

Other highlights from the analysis include: Online dating has become the second-most-common way for couples to meet, behind only meeting through friends.

According to research by Michael Rosenfeld from Stanford University and Reuben Thomas from City College of New York, in the early 1990s, less than 1 percent of the population met partners through printed personal advertisements or other commercial intermediaries.

“Our model predicts that, on average, marriages created when online dating becomes available last longer than those created in societies without this technology,” they wrote. Online daters who marry are less likely to break down and are associated with slightly higher marital satisfaction rates than those of couples who met offline, according to a 2013 study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Of couples who got together online, 5.9 percent broke up, versus 7.6 percent of those who met offline, the study found. divorce rate is 40 percent to 50 percent, experts say.

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